Stubble Quail by David Ong

This page features a collection of bird photographs taken by David Ong and other Branch members and supporters, including Murray Chambers, Marlene Lyell, Roy Peachey, Donna Pollard, Duncan Turnbull, Keith Stockwell and Dallas Wyatt.

Three web pages feature birds that have been observed in southern (Riverina) New South Wales, northern Victoria and/or central Victoria, i.e. in the region covered by this BirdLife Branch. Most of the photographs have been taken in our region.

This gallery continues onto two other page/s which can be accessed by clicking here for page 2 and here for page 3.

Over 150 bird species found in our region are shown in colour.

Possibly with a few exceptions, birds displayed on these pages are arranged in the same order as they appear in most of the recently-published field guides. The order and the common names used are based on the proposals of Dr Leslie Christies and Mr Walter Boles, both of the Australian Museum in Sydney.

That means that most of the birds that appear on this page are waterbirds, (including herons, ducks and waders), birds of prey or pigeons.

About the photographers
Several years ago, soon after David Ong started taking photographs of birds found in the wider Echuca district, David and I decided to put a gallery of his bird photos on line.

Subsequently, several other members of our Branch started forwarding me some great photos for our newsletter and for use in brochures.

Relatively new to birding, Bendigo member Murray Chambers has only been taking bird photographs for a few years, but the quality of his photographs is outstanding.

Marlene Lyell has been a bird observer for many years. Marlene lives in the Axedale area and she is often able to get great bird photographs on her own property.

Dallas Wyatt was a foundation member of our Branch and used to farm at Wyuna. He has now moved to Gippsland.

Roy Peachey lives close to the Barmah forest and his wonderful bird photographs have appeared in a number of publications.

Eric Smith lives in Echuca.

Whilst Duncan Turnbull does not live in our region, he attends most of our 'three consecutive day outings' and ha spent much time in our region. Some of Duncan's photographs were taken outside of our region.

Keith Stockwell is secretary of our branch.

With the merger of BOCA and Birds Australia to form BirdLife Australia, it has been necessary to revamp the web site using certain colours and fonts. Along with the upgrade, the opportunity has been taken to include some of the many great photographs in the Branch collection, not just those taken by David.

We ask that you respect the copyright of these photographs. Under certain circumstances, the photographers may be prepared to provide high resolution copies for use by non-profit bodies. However, we will not undermine professional photographers who depend upon selling their own photographs for a livelihood.

 

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on this page.
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu
Ostrich

Stubble Quail
Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill

Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

 

Links to web sites featuring photo galleries of Australian birds

ABC Science Lab: Backyard Birds

Abberton Bird Galleries
Bill Jolly's site

Australian Bird Photography
Peter Fuller's birding site

Australian Birdlife Photo Library
photos by Greg Holland and Leon Keasey; commercial site

Australian Museum's photos of Australian birds

Aviceda Australian Bird Image Database
by Tom Tarrant; includes bird video clips

BirdQuest: Australian Photo Gallery
Kevin Vang's site

Birdway: photos of Australian birds
photos by Ian Montgomery; commercial site

Cheryl Ridge's Photo Gallery
(bird section)

Chris Ross Bird Gallery: Aus-Natural

David Kleinert Photography
photos, many of which were taken in the Murray Valley, by David Kleinert

Flickr
Australian Bird Section

Gondwana Guides' bird photo gallery
(photographs, mainly of SE Qld birds by Barry Davies and Dan Blunt)

Graham Chapman Photographics

Jon Hosford's 'Winderdoon Bird Galley'
Jon Hosford was co-founder of this Branch

PhotoBOCA
BOCA's photographic group

Photo Gallery of Australian Birds
Paul Hackett's site

 

Birds which are listed on this page are as follows:
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu
Ostrich

Stubble Quail
Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill

Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

Birds included on the second (next)web page are as follows:

Galah
Long-billed Corella
Little Corella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Cockatiel
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Little Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Superb Parrot
Crimson Rosella (yellow form)
Crimson Rosella (Crimson form)
Eastern Rosella
Australian (Mallee) Ringneck
Blue Bonnet
Swift Parrot
Red-rumped Parrot
Budgerigar
Blue-winged Parrot
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo
Black-eared Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Barking Owl
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Azure Kingfisher
Laughing Kookaburra
Red-backed Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Rainbow Bee-eater
Dollarbird
White-throated Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Superb Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
White-browed Scrubwren
Shy Heathwren
Speckled Warbler
Weebill
Western Gerygone
White-throated Gerygone
Striated Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Inland Thornbill
Southern Whiteface

Spotted Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
Eastern Spinebill
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
White-fronted Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-throated Miner
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Little Wattlebird
Red Wattlebird
Crimson Chat
Orange Chat
White-fronted Chat
Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
Black-chinned Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
White-naped honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Noisy friarbird
Little Friarbird
Striped Honeyeater
Painted Honeyeater

 

Birds included on the third web page of this gallery are as follows:.
Introduced birds are not pictured on these pages.
Grey-crowned Babbler
White-browed Babbler
Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Spotted Quail-thrush
Varied Sittella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Triller
Crested Shrike-tit
Gilbert's Whistler
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Shrike-thrush
Crested Bellbird
Olive-backed Oriole
White-
breasted Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow
White-
browed Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow
Grey Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Pied Currawong
Grey Currawong
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Leaden Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher
White-winged Chough
Jacky Winter
Scarlet Robin
Red-capped Robin
Flame Robin
Rose Robin
Hooded Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Southern Scrub-robin
Horsfield's Bushlark
Eurasian Skylark
Golden-headed Cisticola
Australian Reed-Warbler
Little Grassbird
Rufous Songlark
Brown Songlark
Silvereye
White-backed Swallow
Welcome Swallow
Fairy Martin
Tree Martin
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Mistletoebird
Zebra Finch
Red-browed Finch
Diamond Firetail
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Australasian Pipit
European Goldfinch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on this page.
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu

Stubble Quail
Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill

Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

 

 

 

 

 

icon_blue

Bird Photo Gallery 1


Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike by David Ong

Photo gallery of Echuca district birds

This is page 1 of three pages of photographs of bird species observed in northern Victoria, central Victoria (Bendigo area) and/or southern (Riverina) New South Wales.

~ Photographs of David Ong ~

Additional photography by Murray Chambers, Malcolm Cousland, Marlene Lyell, Roy Peachey, Donna Pollard,
Duncan Turnbull, Eric Smith, Keith Stockwell and Dallas Wyatt.

 


Emus
Emu
The flightless Emu is the largest Australian bird.
The male looks after young birds. This photo was taken on Gulpa Island, a precinct of the new Murray Valley National Park.
Photographer: David Ong


Ostrich
Ostrich

For several decades, several generations of Ostriches has been free to roam on farmland alongside the Barham-Caldwell Road, west of the intersection with Perricoota Road where the above photo was taken. They can be regarded as wild.
Introduced species.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell



Stubble Quail
Stubble Quail
At times, a common species in grassland areas.
During prolonged periods of drought, numbers are low.
Photographer: David Ong

Brown Quail
Brown Quail
Usually only found in specific habitats. A ground-dwelling bird; flies low to ground. Sometimes observed at the Walliston Road entrance to Gulpa Island and along Gulpa Creek Road.
Photographer: David Ong


Magpie Geese
Magpie Goose

Very uncommon in our district, Magpie Geese are sometimes sighted at Baillieu's Lagoon, Torrumbarry and near the Kyabram Fauna Park.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell


Plumed W Duck
Plumed Whistling Duck
This species is sometimes absent from our region. However, following heavy rains early in 2011, many Plumed Ducks were observed on flooded paddocks.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Musk Duck
Musk Duck

A few individuals are sometimes sighted on local wetlands.
The male has a prominent leathery flap handing under its beak
At times, males may be observed splashing water into the air
.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Freckled Duck
Freckled Duck

Endangered. Rarely observed in our region
Photographer: Malcolm Cousland
Black Swan
Black Swan
Moderately common on local wetlands.
This photo was taken
from a Bird Hide in the Reed Beds near Mathoura.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 

Shelduck
Australian Shelduck

Sometimes observed in local wetlands.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

Black Swan
Black Swan by Dallas Wyatt
Wood Ducks
Wood Duck family by Murray Chambers

swood Duck
Wood Duck

Almost every local dam and wetland usually has some Wood Duck
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Duck
Pink-eared Duck

Moderately common. This smart-looking duck is found over much of the continent. Sometimes scores of them can be observed on wetlands such as Lake Murphy south of Kerang.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Shoveler
Australasian Shoveler

Sometimes observed in local wetlands.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

 

Grey Teal
Grey Teal

Grey Teal is a common bird of wetland areas.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

 

Chestnut Teal
Chestnut Teal

Not common but occasionally sighted on local lakes.
This is a male; the female is far less colourful.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

Pacific Black Duck
Pacific Black Duck
Very common bird of dams, lakes, parks and waterways.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Hardhead
Hardhead

Often sighted on wetlands in our region. This specimen was photographed at Edithvale Wetlands (Melbourne).
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Blued-billed duck
Blue-billed Duck

A few individuals are occasionally observed in our region.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 


Australasian Grebe
Australasian Grebe
Probably the most common of the three grebe species of our region. Sometime's there's just one or a few on a dam and sometimes there's hundreds on a lake or swamp. The bird pictured is a male. This species is sometimes called Little Grebe.
Photographer: David Ong.

 

 

Hoary-headed Grebe
Hoary-headed Grebe
Moderately common. Sometimes present on wetlands in large numbers. From a distance, it is often hard to identify whether Grebes are Australasian or Hoary-headed.
Photographer: David Ong


 

 

Grebe
Great Crested Grebe
Uncommon; usually observed in deep water of wetlands. This individual was photographed from the Reed Beds Swamp bird hide, off Picnic Point Road, Mathoura.
Photographer: David Ong

Rock Dove
Introduced
Also known as Feral Pigeon or Racing Pigeon.

 

 

Spotted Turtle Dove
Spotted Dove

Introduced
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 

Bronzewing
Common Bronzewing
The Common Bronzewing is far less common
than the Crested Pigeon in our area.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Crested Pigeon
Crested Pigeon
Crested Pigeons appear to be extending their range southwards as far as Melbourne.
Some locals incorrectly confuse them with Topknot Pigeons.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 


Diamond Dove
Diamond Dove

This inland bird is rarely observed in our region which lies at the south-eastern edge of its range.
The bird pictured was observed near Picola.
Photographer: David Ong.

 

 

Peaceful Dove
Peaceful Dove
The Peaceful Dove is much more common in our area than the Diamond Dove but not nearly as common as the Crested Pigeon
Photographer: David Ong


 

 

Tawny Frogmouth
Tawny Frogmouth

A night bird, the Tawny Frogmouth is occasionally sighted in the region. This bird is very hard to spot when perched on a tree branch. Murray photographed this family near Bendigo.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

Spotted Nightjar
Spotted Nightjar

Occasionally observed in the region. Several observers have seen this species in Kamarooka Forest.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

Tawny Frogmouth
Tawny Frogmouth by Donna Pollard


Owlet Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar

A night bird, Owlet Nightjar is only occasionally
observed in our region. This species spends daylight hours in tree hollows or rock crevasses.
Some observers report having seen one at Black Rock in Greater Bendigo National Park.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Owlet Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 


White-throated Needletail

Rarely observed in the region, this bird is sometimes observed in flocks flying high accompanying the passing of a cold front.

Fork-tailed Swift

Rarely observed in the region, this bird is sometimes observed in flocks ahead of summer thunder storms.


 

DarterspaceD

Australian Darter
Moderately common along waterways. Some call this wetland bird a Snake Bird because of its long thin neck. Usually solitary, in pairs or in a small family group. Scores of Darters frequently nest alongside Cockatoo Lagoon, Torrumbarry.
Photographer: David Ong



Cormorant
Little Pied Cormorant
Moderately common along local waterways.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Great Cormorant
Great Cormorant

This black cormorant that is moderately common along waterways, Great Cormorant is less common than the Little Black Cormorant.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Little Black Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
This species is moderately common along local waterways. This wetland bird typically sits on a branch over water.
Photographer: David Ong




Pied Cormorant
Far less common in our region than the Little Pied Cormorant.

 

 

Pelicans
Australian Pelican
Pelicans are sometimes observed on local lakes and lagoons.
This photo above was taken at Little Lake Boort by David Ong. The photo below was taken by Murray Chambers.

Pelican

 

 

Aust. Bittern
Australasian Bittern

Over the past few years, there have been sightings of this bird at the Reed beds near Mathoura, at Wanganella Swamp and at other wetlands of our region.
Roy Peachey took this photo in the Reed Beds near Mathoura.
Photographer: Roy Peachey.

 

Note: Occasionally, the Little Bittern has also been observed in our region, e.g. the Reed Beds at Mathoura and the Wanganella Swamp. No photo of a Little Bittern has been contributed to this gallery.

 


Heron
White-necked Heron
Also known as Pacific Heron, the White-necked Heron is moderately common on local wetlands and dams.
It tends to be a solitary bird and is not often in a flock.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Intermediate Egret
Intermediate Egret
Uncommon but, when conditions are to their liking, scores of them sometimes breed in the Reed Beds near Mathoura.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Great Egret
Eastern Great Egret
Th
is photo of an Eastern Great Egret was taken near Picola and used as the cover photo of a brochure on the birds of the Gunbower District. When conditions are to their liking, Great Egrets sometimes nest in Deniliquin's Island Sanctuary, on Gunbower Island and in Barmah-Millewa Forest.
Photographer: Roy Peachey.

 

 

Cattle Egret
Cattle Egret

The Cattle Egret introduced itself into Australia from Asia and are far more common in Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales. There are a few in our region.

 


Egret
Eastern Great Egret
The Eastern Great Egret is the most common and the largest of the four egret species found in our region. It has a distinctive curve in its neck.
Photographer: David Ong

Greagt Egret

 

 


White-faced heron
White-faced Heron

Also known as Pacific Heron, individual birds are often seen
alongside irrigation channels and in shallow wetland areas.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell
Little Egret
The Little Egret is occasionally seen in local wetlands.

 

Nankeen Night Heron
Nankeen Night Heron
Flocks of Nankeen Night Herons are often observed in Barmah-Millewa Forest and elsewhere, roosting in riverside trees (especially willows) during daylight hours.
Hundreds nested In Barmah Forest during 2011.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Glossy Ibis
Glossy Ibis
Although not often observed in our region, huge numbers are sometimes seen each evening, flying into Fivebough Swamp, Leeton.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 


White IbisAustralian White Ibis

White Ibis are often observed on flooded paddocks and in wetland areas. White Ibis often nest in Gum Lagoon near Gunbower.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Straw-necked_Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
This species is very common on farmland and is sometimes found on waterfront housing estates.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

RS
Royal Spoonbill
Moderately common on wetlands. This Royal Spoonbill was photographed at Cussen Park, Tatura.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill
FIn our region, the Yellow-billed Spoonbill is far more common than the Royal Spoonbill. Birds may be solitary or in a small group, sometimes working together feeding in a line across a wetland or wet paddock.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill by Murray Chambers
Note: There are more waders and waterbirds beneath the raptors.
Black-shouldered Kite
Black-shouldered Kite by Murray Chambers

 

Black-shouldered Kite
Black-shouldered Kite

This bird of prey is often observed hovering over roads or farmland seeking prey.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

Square-tailed Kite
Square-tailed Kite
There have been only occasional sightings of
Square-tailed Kites in our region, e.g. near Torrumbarry during 2010. The bird shown above was photographed at
One Eye Forest near Heathcote
in February 2012.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell

 

 

White-bellied Sea-eagle
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Uncommon. Sea-eagles nest in Barmah Forest, Hird Swamp and Baillieu's (Richardson's) Lagoon.

Please report sightings of Sea-eagles nesting in Barmah Forest to Bruce Wehner of Parks Victoria.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell

LOCALLY-OBSERVED RAPTORS
EAGLES:
Wedgetailed Eagle (=Eaglehawk), Little Eagle, White-bellied Sea-eagle (= White-breasted Sea-eagle)

KITES:
Black Kite, Whistling Kite, Black-shouldered Kite, Square-tailed Kite

HARRIERS:
Swamp Harrier (= Marsh Harrier), Spotted Harrier

FALCONS:
Brown Falcon, Black Falcon, Peregrine Falcon, Hobby, Nankeen Kestrel

GOSHAWKS & SPARROWHAWK:
Brown Goshawk, Collared Sparrowhawk

 


Whistling Kite
Whistling Kite

Moderately common along waterways, including Gunbower Creek (alongside of which some nest) and the Murray Rive.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Black Kite
Black Kite

Black Kites are reasonably common along some local waterways, e.g. Gunbower Creek. Sometimes they are sighted near rubbish tips and chicken farms.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Brown Goshawk
Brown Goshawk

Brown Goshawks have been observed over most of our region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers




Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawks are occasionally sighted across our region. Collared Sparrowharks are very similar in appearance to Brown Goshawks but are smaller and the tips of their wings point upwards in flight: the wings of Brown Goshawks are arched.
Photographer: Murray Chambers .

 

Spotted Harrier
Spotted Harrier

The Spotted Harrier is uncommon in our region.
This bird was photographed in Kamarooka Forest.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 

Swamp harrier
Swamp Harrier
Swamp Harriers are often seen gliding over local swampland, e.g. the Reed beds near Mathoura (where this photo was taken), Richardson's Lagoon (near Torrumbarry) and Murphy Swamp (near Torrumbarry).
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

WTE
Wedgetailed Eagle

Found throughout Australia, this very large eagle (224) is sometimes seen feeding on carcases along highways.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Little Eagle
Little Eagle

Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

Wedgetailed Eagle
Wedge-tailed Eagle by Eric Smith
Brown falcon
Brown Falcon by Murray Chambers
Hobby
Hobby by Murray Chambers

 

Nankeen Kestrel
Nankeen Kestrel

Reasonably common, especially in agricultural areas.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

Falcon
Brown Falcon

A common raptor often observed sitting on fence posts throughout the region. Some individual birds may be of light phase and others may be of dark phase.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Hobby
Hobby

This raptor is not common in our region; the species is found over most of Australia.
Photographer: David Ong


 

Black Falcon
Not common but a pair sometimes nest along Kow Swamp Road south of the Davies Homestead. Distinguish from Grey Falcon by gliding without much flapping of wings.
Peregrine Falcon
Not common. In January 2012, a pair with young were observed nesting in a tower of Echuca Uniting Church.

 

Brolga
Brolga
Brolgas are sometimes sighted on local wetlands and farms, e.g. Greens Lake near Corop.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Swamphen
Purple Swamphen

A common wetland bird throughout the region.
Photographer: Dallas Wyatt

 

 

Lewin's Rail
A wetland bird that is hard to see amongst reeds and rushes.

 


Rail
Buff-banded Rail
This water bird is occasionally sighted in the region. Although this specimen was photographed at Edithvale wetlands (Melbourne), this species is often seen in the Echuca district.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Baillons
Baillon's Crake
Uncommon; usually found only in shallow wetlands. This rather secretive wetland bird is seldom observed for long.This specimen was pictured on the mud-flats of Little Lake Boort.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

S Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Usually found only in shallow wetlands, crakes, rails and snipe are difficult birds to observe (and photograph) as they feed in mud amongst reeds and rushes of wetlands. In the greater Echuca District, this species is often observed at swamps in the Corop area, Cussen Park Tatura and Kinnairds Wetlands, Numurkah. This bird was photographed at Little Lake Boort. The Spotless Crake has also been observed in the district.
Photographer: David Ong

Spotless Crake
Spotless Crake
Uncommon; crakes are seldom-seen birds of reedy wetlands. This bird was photographed at the Reed Beds, Mathoura.
Photographer: Roy Peachey

Native hen
Black-tailed native Hen
At times, large flocks of Black-tailed native Hens are seen on local wetlands. Late in 2011, vast numbers descended upon rice crops in soutthern NSW, destroying the crops.
Photographer: David Ong


Black-tailed Native Hen
Black-tailed Native Hen by Marlene Lyell

 

Moorhen
Dusky Moorhen
Common, large wetland bird.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Coot
Eurasian Coot

A very common waterbird, hundreds of Eurasian Coot are sometimes observed on local wetlands.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Bustard
Australian Bustard
Very uncommon locally. This bird aroused some excitement amongst birders when it spent some time on private property near Pyramid Hill during a locust plague in mid 2005. Groups of Bustards are usually only observed further inland.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Curlew
Bush Stone Curlew
This bird is becoming increasingly uncommon.
It likes to live amongst fallen branches but with a good all-round
view of the surrounding countryside. Several live in the grounds of Barham Golf Club and some are kept at Kyabram Fauna Park.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 

Bush Stone Curlew
Bush Stone Curlew by Keith Stockwell

WADERS

Waders
Red-necked Stint (top left) and Red-capped Plovers by David Ong


Black-winged Stilt
Black-winged Stilt
This Pairs or small groups are sometimes seen at dams and swamps. This photo was used on the front cover of an Echuca bird brochure produced for Echuca landcare Group.
Photographer: Murray Chambers


Red-necked Avocet
Red-necked Avocet
Groups of Red-necked Avocets are sometimes observed feeding along the margin of swamps and lakes.
They seem to prefer brackish water.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Banded Stilt

This species seems to prefer salty water, e.g. Lake Tutchewop. Hundreds of Banded Stilt and were at Lake Tutchewop and other lakes in the Kerang region during 2012.

 


Red-capped Plover
Red-capped Plover

This wader is reasonably common at times. It demands gently-sloping mud flats.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell


Plover
Double-banded Plover
This wader is uncommon in our area. It prefers to feed on shallow lake margins. Apart from the Echuca District, this bird is not usually found so far inland.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Inland Dotterel
Inland Dotterel

Occasionally sighted in our region. This bird was photographed on one of the grassland precincts of Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: Dallas Wyatt

 


Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Moderately common on the margins of wetlands. Nests on the ground. This photo was taken alongside Little Lake Boort.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
This species is often observed at the edge of
wetlands in the area throughout the year. Groups may number over 100 individuals when conditions are favourable. This bird was on a shallow wetland near Pyramid Hill.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Banded Lapwing
Banded Lapwing
Common Whilst the Masked Lapwing is fairly common throughout our region, the Banded Lapsing is increasingly uncommon. It prefers grassy plains, but much is being lost to cropping. There is still a large flock on the Patho Plains near Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: Kdeith Stockwell

 


Masked Lapwing
Masked Lapwing

Common in our region. This bird prefers the margins of wetlands. It is protective of its eggs which it lays in a nest on the ground, and does not hesitate to attack anyone who comes near the nest. One pair often nest in the grounds of the Echuca hospital.
Photographer: Murray
Chambers

 



Plains-wandered_female

Plains-wanderer
female
Endangered. In the case of most birds, it is the male that is the more colourful. However, the female Plains-wanderer is more colourful than the male. This species is found only in suitable indigenous grassland areas. A number of indigenous grassland areas been reserved on the Patho Plain to help protect endangered grasses, dunnarts and Plains-wanderer. Several grassland areas are satellite areas of Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: David Ong



Plains-wanderer
Plains-wanderer
male
Apart from the several grassland precincts of Terrick Terrick National Park, grassland reserves to protect this species have been set aside on the Wanderers Plain (west of Kerang) and at Oolambeyan between Deniliquin and Hay. The Plains-wanderer is in the wader family even though it lives on dry grassland plains. It seems to prefer grasslands with red earth. Red soils cover only a fraction of the remaining plains grassland.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Snipe
Australian Painted Snipe
This endangered wader prefers to feed in shallow water where there is cover (e.g. lignum or reeds). The species has been seen from time to time in Hird Swamp near Cohuna. This bird, and seven others, was observed south of Rutherglen early in 2006. Birders from all over Australia travelled to Rutherglen to see the Painted Snipe.
Several Painted Snipe were observed at Wanganella Swamp
(north of Deniliquin) during 2011. Relatively few photographs have been taken of this elusive, rare bird.
Photographer: David Ong.

 

 

Lathams Snipe
Latham's Snipe
This secretive wetland bird is rarely observed for more than a few minutes. This individual was feeding in reeds at Little Lake Boort.
Photographer: David Ong.

 

 

OTHER WADERS
Sometimes flocks of migratory waders arrive on shallow wetlands over the summer months.



Species observed in our region have included:

Marsh Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper

Common Greenshank

Common Sandpiper

Ruddy Turnstone (pictured to right)

Red-necked Stint

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (pictured above right)

 

 

 

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

This individual was observed alongside sewage treatment ponds at Epsom, near Bendigo.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Ruddy Turnstone
Ruddy Turnstone
This species has been observed at local waste wagter treatment facilities (i.e. sewage farms).
Photographer: Keith Stockwell









Red-chested
Red-chested Button-quail

This species is occasionally sighted in the region
(e.g. in Terrick Terrick National Park woodland area),
especially after wet periods promotes grass growth.
It is similar in appearance to Painted Button Quail.
Photographer: David Ong


 


LittleBQ
Little Button-quail

This is an uncommon species at times but numbers increase following periods of prolific grass growth. Similar in appearance to Red-chested Button-quail. This specimen was observed in Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Painted Button Quail
Painted Button-quail
An uncommon bird but numbers increase following periods of prolific grass growth.
Murray took this photo in the Kamarooka Forest.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 


Pratincole
Australian Pratincole
Breeding plumage
Uncommon
Northern Victoria is the south-eastern edge of this
inland bird's range.
An individual was observed late in 2007 alongside Clee Road, near Terrick Terrick East precinct of Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell


 

Gull-billed Tern
This tern is sometimes observed in our region.

 

 

Whiskered Tern
Whiskered Terns are not seen often
but groups are sometimes observed on or near local lakes,
e.g. Lake Boga and lake Tutchewop.
Photo at foot of this page .

 

 

Caspian Tern
Caspian Tern
Occasionally large numbers of Caspian Terns are sighted near lakes in our region.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull.

 

 

Silver Gull
Silver Gull
Often called Sea Gull, this species is sometimes observed
far inland. It is not common in our region but individuals or groups are sometimes observed on wetlands and at rubbish tips.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell


swhiskered Terns
Whiskered Terns at Lake Tutchewop (between Lake Boga and Kerang) by Malcolm Cousland
This collection continues as Bird Photo Gallery Two
Copyright of photographs remains with the photographers. Please respect copyrights. District members may wish to submit photographs of birds not pictured in this gallery.

 

Bird Photo Gallery 1

 

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Sixteenth year on the web.

To contact webmeister email stocky at mcmedia dot com .au
Mail address: Secretary, BirdLife Echuca District, 11 Hillview Ave MOAMA 2731
This site was established during 1996.
Latest minor revision to this page: March 2013