Superb Parrot
Superb Parrot by David Ong

This page features a collection of bird photographs by David Ong and other Branch members and supporters, including Murray Chambers, Marlene Lyell, Roy Peachey, Duncan Turnbull, Keith Stockwell and Dallas Wyatt.

This gallery continues onto two other page/s which can be accessed by clicking here for page 1 and here for page 3.

The three galleries feature birds that have been observed in southern (Riverina) New South Wales, northern Victoria and/or central Victoria, i.e. in the region covered by this BirdLife Branch. Most of the photographs have been taken in our region.

About 150 bird species found in our region are shown in colour.

Possibly with a few exceptions, birds displayed on these pages are arranged in the same order as they appear in most of the recently-published field guides. The order and the common names used are based on the proposals of Dr Leslie Christies and Mr Walter Boles, both of the Australian Museum in Sydney.

That means that most of the birds that appear on this page are parrots and bush birds.

 

 

Birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on this page are as follows:
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.

Galah
Long-billed Corella
Little Corella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Cockatiel
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Little Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Superb Parrot
Crimson Rosella (yellow form)
Crimson Rosella (Crimson form)
Eastern Rosella
Australian (Mallee) Ringneck
Blue Bonnet
Swift Parrot
Red-rumped Parrot
Budgerigar
Blue-winged Parrot
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo
Black-eared Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Barking Owl
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Azure Kingfisher
Laughing Kookaburra
Red-backed Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Rainbow Bee-eater
Dollarbird
White-throated Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Superb Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
White-browed Scrubwren
Shy Heathwren
Speckled Warbler
Weebill
Western Gerygone
White-throated Gerygone
Striated Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Inland Thornbill
Southern Whiteface

Spotted Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
Eastern Spinebill
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
White-fronted Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-throated Miner
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Little Wattlebird
Red Wattlebird
Crimson Chat
White-fronted Chat
Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
Black-chinned Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
White-naped honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Noisy friarbird
Little Friarbird
Striped Honeyeater
Painted Honeyeater

 

 

 

 

Links to web sites featuring photo galleries of Australian birds

ABC Science Lab: Backyard Birds

Abberton Bird Galleries
Bill Jolly's site

Australian Bird Photography
Peter Fuller's birding site

Australian Birdlife Photo Library
photos by Greg Holland and Leon Keasey; commercial site

Australian Museum's photos of Australian birds

Aviceda Australian Bird Image Database
by Tom Tarrant; includes bird video clips

BirdQuest: Australian Photo Gallery
Kevin Vang's site

Birdway: photos of Australian birds
photos by Ian Montgomery; commercial site

Cheryl Ridge's Photo Gallery
(bird section)

Chris Ross Bird Gallery: Aus-Natural

David Kleinert Photography
photos, many of which were taken in the Murray Valley, by David Kleinert

Flickr
Australian Bird Section

Gondwana Guides' bird photo gallery
(photographs, mainly of SE Qld birds by Barry Davies and Dan Blunt)

Graham Chapman Photographics

Jon Hosford's 'Winderdoon Bird Galley'
Jon Hosford was co-founder of this Branch

PhotoBOCA
BOCA's photographic group

Photo Gallery of Australian Birds
Paul Hackett's site

 

Birds which are listed on the first web page of this gallery are as follows:
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu

Stubble Quail
Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill

Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

Birds included on this web page are as follows:
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Galah
Long-billed Corella
Little Corella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Cockatiel
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Little Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Superb Parrot
Crimson Rosella (yellow form)
Crimson Rosella (Crimson form)
Eastern Rosella
Australian (Mallee) Ringneck
Blue Bonnet
Swift Parrot
Red-rumped Parrot
Budgerigar
Blue-winged Parrot
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo
Black-eared Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Barking Owl
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Azure Kingfisher
Laughing Kookaburra
Red-backed Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Rainbow Bee-eater
Dollarbird
White-throated Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Superb Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
White-browed Scrubwren
Shy Heathwren
Speckled Warbler
Weebill
Western Gerygone
White-throated Gerygone
Striated Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Inland Thornbill
Southern Whiteface

Spotted Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
Eastern Spinebill
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
White-fronted Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-throated Miner
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Little Wattlebird
Red Wattlebird
Crimson Chat
White-fronted Chat
Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
Black-chinned Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
White-naped honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Noisy friarbird
Little Friarbird
Striped Honeyeater
Painted Honeyeater

 

Gallery Page 3
(next web page)

Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Spotted Quail-thrush
Varied Sittella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Triller
Crested Shrike-tit
Gilbert's Whistler
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Shrike-thrush
Crested Bellbird
Olive-backed Oriole
White-
breasted Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow
White-
browed Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow
Grey Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Pied Currawong
Grey Currawong
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Leaden Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher
White-winged Chough
Jacky Winter
Scarlet Robin
Red-capped Robin
Flame Robin
Rose Robin
Hooded Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Southern Scrub-robin
Horsfield's Bushlark
Eurasian Skylark
Golden-headed Cisticola
Australian Reed-Warbler
Little Grassbird
Rufous Songlark
Brown Songlark
Silvereye
White-backed Swallow
Welcome Swallow
Fairy Martin
Tree Martin
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Mistletoebird
Zebra Finch
Red-browed finch
Diamond Firetail
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Australasian Pipit
European Goldfinch



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Variegated Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
Our region is at the south-eastern edge of the range of this species. This species has been sighted in Kamarooka Forest and to the north-west, e.g. at Goschen and Tresco West Bushland Reserve.
Photographer: Albert Wright

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on page 1 of this gallery.
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu

Stubble Quail
1Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill

Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

and on this page...


Galah
Long-billed Corella
Little Corella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Cockatiel
Rainbow Lorikeet (south of region)
Musk Lorikeet
Little Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Superb Parrot
Crimson Rosella (yellow form)
Crimson Rosella (Crimson form)
Eastern Rosella
Australian (Mallee) Ringneck
Blue Bonnet (north-west of region)
Red-rumped Parrot
Budgerigar
Blue-winged Parrot
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo
Black-eared Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Barking Owl
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet-nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Laughing Kookaburra
Azure Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Red-backed Kingfisher
Rainbow Bee-eater
Dollarbird
White-throated Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Superb Fairy-wren
Splendid Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
Spotted Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
White-browed Scrubwren
Shy Heathwren (Hylacola)
Speckled Warbler
Weebill
Western Gerygone
Brown Thornbill
Chestnut-rumped Thornbill
Buff-rumped Thornbill)
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Yellow (Little) Thornbill
Striated Thornbill
Southern Whiteface
Red Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Noisy Miner (common)
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Black-chinned Honeyeater
White-naped Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
New Holland Honeyeater
Black Honeyeater
Eastern Spinebill
Crimson Chat
Orange Chat
White-fronted Chat
Brown-headed Honeyeater
Black-chinned Honeyeater
White-naped Honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Noisy Friarbird
Little Friarbird
Painted Honeyeater
Striped Honeyeater

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on the next web page, page 3, of this gallery.

Grey-crowned Babbler
White-browed Babbler
Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Spotted Quail-thrush
Varied Sittella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Triller
Crested Shrike-tit
Gilbert's Whistler
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Shrike-thrush
Crested Bellbird
Olive-backed Oriole
White-
breasted Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow
White-
browed Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow
Grey Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Pied Currawong
Grey Currawong
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Leaden Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher
White-winged Chough
Jacky Winter
Scarlet Robin
Red-capped Robin
Flame Robin
Rose Robin
Hooded Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Southern Scrub-robin
Horsfield's Bushlark
Eurasian Skylark
Golden-headed Cisticola
Australian Reed-Warbler
Little Grassbird
Rufous Songlark
Brown Songlark
Silvereye
Welcome Swallow
Fairy Martin
Tree Martin
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Mistletoebird
Zebra Finch
Red-browed Finch
Diamond Firetail
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Australasian Pipit
European Goldfinch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bird Photo Gallery 2


Black Honeyeater by David Ong

Photo gallery of Echuca district birds

This is page 2 of 3 pages of photographs of bird species that have been observed in northern Victoria, central Victoria (Bendigo area) and/or southern (Riverina) New South Wales.

 

~ Photographs of David Ong ~

Additional photography by Murray Chambers, Marlene Lyell, Roy Peachey, Donna Polllard, Duncan Turnbull,
Albert Wright and Keith Stockwell

Long-billed Corellas
Long-billed Corellas by Murray Chambers

Galah
Galah

The Galah is one of the most commonly-seen birds of our region. It is often observed in towns and on farmland.
Photographer: David Ong

LB Corella
Long-billed Corella

The Long-billed Corella is one of the most commonly-seen birds of our region. Large flocks can be observed in towns, on farmland and in riverside forests.
Photographer: David Ong



Little Corella
Little Corella
S
ometimes there are Little Corellas amongst flocks of Long-billed Corellas. Occasionally, however, a large flock of Little Corellas may be observed.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Sulphur-crested
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Sulphur-crested Cockatoos are very common in the region, often forming large flocks. They are often observed feeding on the ground with Corellas and Galahs.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Cockatiel
Cockatiel

Cockatiels are occasionally sighted in our region,
sometimes in the company of Budgerigars.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell



Rainbowe Lorikeet
Rainbow Lorikeet

This species is common in Central Victoria but is rarely observed in the northern and western parts of our region.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 

Musk Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet by Murray Chambers

 

Musk Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet

Flocks of Musk Lorikeets are often heard
as they feed amongst foliage but are difficult to sight.
They are nectar feeders and fast fliers.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet

This Lorikeet is similar to the Little Lorikeet in appearance, but has a purple crown.
Photographer: David Ong

~ Little Lorikeet occurs to the east and south of our region ~

 

 


Superb Parrot
Superb Parrot
Although the Superb Parrot is endangered, it is often observed in Barmah-Millewa Forest, in the Picola area, at Lower Thule and to the north of the region.
Photographer: David Ong


Cfrimson Rosella
Crimson Rosella

Yellow form.
Around Echuca and along the Murray River and its wetlands, the Crimson Rosella is, in fact, yellow and grey in appearance.
The crimson form is found away from the Murray River and throughout central Victoria
Photographer: David Ong

 


Eastern Rosella
Eastern Rosella

Eastern Rosellas are often observed in lightly-timbered farmland and in urban parks.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell.

 


Ringneck
Australian Ringneck

The Australian Ringneck is often observed in Terrick Terrick National Park and to the north-west of the region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers.

 


Blue Bonnet
Blue Bonnet
Blue Bonnets occur to the north and west of Echuca, e.g. around Wanganella, in Tresco West Bushland Reserve, in Goschen Reserve and around Kerang.
Photographer: David Ong
\
Swift Parrot
Swift Parrot
At the start of winter, flocks of Swift Parrots leave Tasmania and cross Bass Strait to the mainland. One of the areas they sometimes visit during winter is the Box-Ironbark forests of central Victoria where they may be observed feeding on blossom.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Budgerigar
Budgerigar

Small flocks of this colourful parrot are sometimes observed in Terrick Terrick National Park and on the plains to the west and north of Echuca. Budgerigars are, perhaps, the most widely-kept pet bird. Some can be taught to speak a few words.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Red-rumped
Red-rumped Parrot

Sometimes called Grass Parros, the Red-rumped Parrot
is often observed in small flocks, feeding alongside country roads and in timbered country.
Adult males are more brightly coloured than females and immatures.
Photographer: Donna Pollard

 


Blue-winged Parrot
The Blue-winged Parrot is rarely sighted in most of our region but small flocks are often sighted along Thomas Road north of Barham and at Goschen Bushland Reserve.

 

 


 

 

Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo

This cuckoo has a metallic sheen.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Black-eared Cuckoo

Uncommon. Cuckoos remove an egg or eggs from another bird's nest and substitute their own. The host bird then feeds the Cuckoo chicks.

 


Shining Bronze Cuckoo

Occasionally sighted in our region,

 


Pallid_Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo

Occasionally sighted in our region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Fanp-tailed cuckoo
Fan-tailed Cuckoo

This is one of the various cuckoo species sighted in our region. It is very similar in appearance to the Brush Cuckoo but has yellow leg.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Brush Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo

The Brush Cuckoo is very similar in appearance to the Fantail Cuckoo, but has grey rather than yellow legs
and the Brush Cuckoo has a paler-coloured breast.
Photographer: Murray Chambers


 

x
Powerful Owl

Very uncommon.
There have been sightings to the east and south of our region. David took this photo in Melbourne.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Barking Owl
Barking Owl

Very uncommon.
Over the past decade, individual birds have been sighted in Womboota Village and in Kamarooka Forest.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

 

Sougthern Boobook
Southern Boobook

Although seldom seen during daylight hours,
Southern Boobooks are often heard at night,
calling in bushland areas.
Duncan took this photo in Cussen Park, Tatura.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull


 

Barn Owl
Eastern Barn Owl

Barn Owls are sometimes observed at night in rural areas, e.g. alongside Bendigo Creek in Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull.

 

 


Azure Kingfisher
Azure Kingfisher

Azure Kingfishers are often observed in the Barmah-Millewa Forest, e.g. from the MV Kingfisher (boat), and alongside water courses over summer.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 



Kookaburra
Laughing Kookaburra

The Laughing Kookaburra is common throughout our region.
It is sometimes seen and heard in urban areas.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

Red-backed Kingfisher
The Red-backed Kingfisher is not as common in as region as any of the other kingfishers listed here. This species has been sighted near The Granites (Wedderburn area).


 

Sacred Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfishers are often sighted alongside waterways
and in bushland throughout our region.
Photographer: David Ong


 


Rainbow-Bee-eater
A summer migrant to the region from further north,
Rainbow Bee-eaters lay their eggs in tunnels which they dig into sandy areas.
Photographer: David Ong


$
Dollarbird
The Dollarbird is a summer visitor to our region and is most likely to be observed close to a river.
Photographer: Albert Wright (?)

 


WT Tree-creeper
White-throated Treecreeper
This species is often observed in forested wetlands,especially in River Red Gum country. The birds climb up tree trunks in search of insects.
Photographer: David Ong


Brown Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Although the Brown Tree-creeper climbs up trees like the White-throated, it spends a lot more time on fallen branches. It is more common than the White-throated in Box-Ironbark country.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Superb fairy-wren
Superb Fairy Wren (male
)
This species is very common throughout the region, especially alongside wetlands, alongside water courses and in home gardens.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Superb Fairy-wren_female
Superb Fairy-wren (female)
Most of the photographs and drawings of the Superb Fairy-wren are of the male. But the female (or juvenile) are attractive despite lacking the bright blue colour of the mature male.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell


 

WW Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren (male)
This species prefers lignum swamps such as the one in The Meadows Wildlife Reserve on the Patho Plains.The male is very conspicuous, more visible to predators, and perhaps this is why most males do not survive for as long as most females.
Photographer: David Ong

 

White-winged fairy-wren_female
White-winged Fairy-wren
By contrast to the male, the female White-winged Fairy-wren is rather drab.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Whiote-browed Scrubwren
White-browed Scrubwren
White-browed Scrubwrens are most likely to be seen in reeds at the edge of wetlands and waterways.
Photographer: David Ong


 

Shy Heathwren
Shy Heathwren
Also called Shy Hylacola, the Shy Heathwren is not
always shy. It prefers wooded country such as that
found in parts of Greater Bendigo National Park.
This individual was photographed on a private
bushland property at Neilborough.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


 

Speckled
Speckled Warbler

This species seems to be restricted to the south and east of our region. Individuals are often sighted at Mount Meg and in The Grampians.
A high resolution copy of this photograph can be purchased online from the Gypsy Twitchers web site
www.gypsytwitchers.com
Photographer: Albert Wright


Weebill

Weebill
The Weebill is the smallest Australian bird.
Despite its small size, it has a reasonably loud call.
Individuals are often observed in gum trees,
seeking nectar and insects.
Photographer: David Ong

Western Gerygone
Western Gerygone

The Western Gerygone is found in local bushland,
e.g. the Moama precinct of Murray Valley National Park
(i.e. the Five Mile Reserve.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell


.
White-throated Gerygone
The White-throated Gerygone is sometimes observed to the east and south of our region but it is unlikely to be observed elsewhere in our region.
The White-throated Gerygone
builds a nest that hangs down from a branch
over a stream.

Striated Thornbill
Striated Thornbill
This species usually feeds high in the tree canopy. Its high-piched calls cannot be heard by many people.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Yellow Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill

This species is widespread throughout our region.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Yellow-rumjped Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill

'Butter Bums' as they are sometimes called, are often observed on the ground, eating seeds and saltbush berries.
The Yellow-rumped Thornbill is frequently observed in bushland and in towns.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 


Chestnut-rumped Thornbill
Chestnut-rumped Thornbill

In our region, the Chestnut-rumped Thornbill is not as common as many other Thornbill species.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 


Buff-rumped
Buff-rumped Thornbill

This species is often observed in woodland areas and close to streams, especially where wattle trees are present.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Inland Thornbill
This species has been observed to in the northern
and western parts of the region.

 


Brown Thornbill
Brown Thornbill
Sometimes called Little Thornbill, this species is most common to the south and east of the region.
Photographer: David Ong



Whiteface
Southern Whiteface
The Southern Whiteface seems to prefer lightly timbered country with lots of fallen timber.
Photographer: David Ong



Spotted Pardalote
Spotted Pardalote
The Spotted Pardalote is common in fred Gum forest, Box-Ironbark forest and other treed areas. Its call sounds like I'm Spotted!
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Striated Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
The Spotted Pardalote is a common bird of River Red Gum forests, Box-Ironbark forests and other wooded areas.
Photographer: David Ong


Striated Pardalote
Striated Pardalote by Murray Chambers
Honeyeaters
Only a few species of honeyeater are usually observed in Red Gum forests in the Echuca area. However, many species are frequently observed in the Box-Ironbark forests around Bendigo and Wedderburn.


Eastern Spinebill
Eastern Spinebill
Our region is at the northern and western edges of this bird's range, so it is not frequently seen except in southern and eastern parts of the region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers.

 


Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
This species is often observed in bushland around Bendigo and Wedderburn.
Photographer: David Ong



Singing Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
In our region, the best places to look for Singing Honeyeater is where there is a variety of eucalypts, some of which are flower for most of the year, e.g. along O'Dea Road and around golf courses.
Photographer: David Ong.

swhite-eared_MC
White-eared Honeyeater
The White-eared Honeyeater is often observed in the Box-Ironbark forests around Bendigo.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater

This species is sometimes observed in the
Box-Ironbark forests of central Victoria.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Purple-gaped honeyeater

Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Uncommon
Sometimes observed in the Box-Ironbark forests of our region.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Fuscous Honeyater
Fuscous Honeyeater
At times, large numbers of Fuscous Honeyeaters may be observed in the Box-Ironbark Forests of Central Victoria. Their numbers were badly impacted upon by the recent prolonged drought.
Photographer: Murray Chambers


White-plumed Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
This is the most-common honeyeater in River Red Gum
country and is found throughout the region.
Photographer: David Ong
White-plumed Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater by Murray Chambers

 

White-fronted Honeyeater
White-fronted Honeyeater
Uncommon
Sometimes observed in the Box-Ironbark forests
of Central Victoria.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 

Noisy Miner
Noisy Miner
Small groups of this bird are often observed at the edge of forests and at the edge of plantations.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Yellow-thraoted Miner
Yellow-throated Miner
Similar in appearance to the Noisy Miner,
this species is the more common of the two in the
north-west parts of the region, e.g. around Kerang.
It is not often observed south-east of Cohuna.
Photographer: David Ong

 

 

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
This inland species is sometimes observed in our region. Common at Gioschen Reserve.
Photographer: David Ong .

 

Litle Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird by Murray Chambers


Little Wattlebird
Little Wattlebird

Less common than Red Wattlebird, Little Wattlebird is
unlikely to be observed around Echuca or north
of the Murray River.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

 


Red Wattlebird
Red Wattlebird
This species is common in urban areas and in bushland throughout our region. Red 'wattles' hang from its neck.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Orange Chat
Orange Chat
Uncommon.
Small flocks of Orange Chats and Crimson Chats are sometimes observed to the north-west of the region,
e.g. on the saltbush plains around Lake Tutchewop.
Photographer: David Ong

White-fronted Chat
White-fronted Chat
This species is found throughout the region.
Individuals and small flocks are sometimes sighted
near creeks and wetlands.
Photographer: David Ong

 



Black Honeyeater
Uncommon in our region.
Sometimes observed feeding on Eremophila e.g. alongside Mahers Creek and alongside Bullock Creek.
Photographer: David Ong

Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Found in Box-Ironbark forests of central Victoria.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Pied Honeyeater
Pied Honeyeater

Not often sighted in our region. This photo was taken at Goschen Reserve, south of Lake Boga.
Photographer: David Ong



NewH_HE
New Holland Honeyeater
New Hollands are more likely to be observed in the south and east of the region than elsewhere. rarely observed in the Echuca area.
Photographer: Donna Pollard

 



Black-chinned Honeyeater

The Black-chinned Honeyeater is sometimes observed in forests and wooded areas of the region.

 

 

________________________________________________________________

Crescent Honeyeater
Rarely observed in our region. No photo available.

 


Brown-headed Honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater

The Brown-headed Honeyeater is reasonably common
in forests throughout the region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


White-naped Honeyeater
White-naped Honeyeater

Often observed in the Box-Ironbark forests of central Victoria.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

Blue-faced Honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Blue-faced honeyeaters are often observed feeding on the nectar of flowering trees and shrubs, especially in Grevillea robusta (Silky Oak).
Photographer: David Ong

 



Noisy Friarbird
Noisy Friarbird
Noisy flocks may be observed in areas where eucalypts are in blossom.
Photographer: David Ong
.

Little Friarbird
Little Friarbird
Sometimes called Leatherhead, this species is often observed not only in Box-Ironbark forests but in urban gardens.
Photographer: David Ong
.

 


Striped Honeyeater
Only occasionally observed in our region

Painted Honeyeater
Occasionally sighted in our region.
.
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Bird Photo Gallery 2

 

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Mail address: Secretary, BirdLife Echuca District, 11 Hillview Ave MOAMA 2731
This site was established during 1996.
Latest revision to this page: October 2012.