Mistletoebird
Mistletoebird by David Ong

This is the third of our three web pages featuring a collection of bird photographs by David Ong and other Branch members and supporters, including Murray Chambers, Malcolm Cousland, Marlene Lyell, Roy Peachey, Donna Pollard, Duncan Turnbull, Albert Wright and Keith Stockwell.

This gallery continues onto two other page/s which can be accessed by clicking here for page 1 and here for page 2.

The three galleries feature birds that have been observed in southern (Riverina) New South Wales, northern Victoria and/or central Victoria, i.e. in the region covered by this BirdLife Branch. Most of the photographs have been taken in our region.

About 150 bird species found in our region are shown in colour.

Possibly with a few exceptions, birds displayed on these pages are arranged in the same order as they appear in most of the recently-published field guides. The order and the common names used are based on the proposals of Dr Leslie Christies and Mr Walter Boles, both of the Australian Museum in Sydney.

That means that most of the birds that appear on this page are bush birds.

BirdLife Echuca District has prepared a number of downloadable birding spot guides. Areas covered by our guides include Barmah Forest, Cohuna-Gunbower, Deniliquin, Echuca-Moama, Gulpa Island Mathoura, Kamarooka Forest, Kanyapella-Wyuna ,Kerang, Perricoota Road Moama and Terrick terrick National Park Click on the District Birding Spots rectangle at the top of this page if you wish to download any of these guides.

 

 

 

 

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on this page.
Introduced birds are not pictured on these pages.
Grey-crowned Babbler
White-browed Babbler
Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Spotted Quail-thrush
Varied Sittella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Ground Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Triller
Crested Shrike-tit
Gilbert's Whistler
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Shrike-thrush
Crested Bellbird
Olive-backed Oriole
White-
breasted Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow
White-
browed Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow
Grey Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Pied Currawong
Grey Currawong
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Leaden Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher
White-winged Chough
Jacky Winter
Scarlet Robin
Red-capped Robin
Flame Robin
Rose Robin
Hooded Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Southern Scrub-robin
Horsfield's Bushlark
Eurasian Skylark
Golden-headed Cisticola
Australian Reed-Warbler
Little Grassbird
Rufous Songlark
Brown Songlark
Silvereye
White-backed Swallow
Welcome Swallow
Fairy Martin
Tree Martin
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Mistletoebird
Zebra Finch
Red-browed Finch
Diamond Firetail
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Australasian Pipit
European Goldfinch



 

 

And now a list of all birds which have been included in these pages are listed below.

 

 

Birds that are listed on the first web page are as follows:

Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu

Stubble Quail
Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

 

Gallery Page 2

Birds included on the previous web page are as follows:
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Galah
Long-billed Corella
Little Corella
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo
Cockatiel
Rainbow Lorikeet
Musk Lorikeet
Little Lorikeet
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Superb Parrot
Crimson Rosella (yellow form)
Crimson Rosella (Crimson form)
Eastern Rosella
Australian (Mallee) Ringneck
Blue Bonnet
Swift Parrot
Red-rumped Parrot
Budgerigar
Blue-winged Parrot
Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoo
Pallid Cuckoo
Brush Cuckoo
Black-eared Cuckoo
Shining Bronze Cuckoo
Fan-tailed Cuckoo
Barking Owl
Southern Boobook
Barn Owl
Azure Kingfisher
Laughing Kookaburra
Red-backed Kingfisher
Sacred Kingfisher
Rainbow Bee-eater
Dollarbird
White-throated Tree-creeper
Brown Tree-creeper
Superb Fairy-wren
White-winged Fairy-wren
Variegated Fairy-wren
Southern Emu-wren
White-browed Scrubwren
Shy Heathwren
Speckled Warbler
Weebill
Western Gerygone
White-throated Gerygone
Striated Thornbill
Yellow Thornbill
Yellow-rumped Thornbill
Inland Thornbill
Southern Whiteface
Spotted Pardalote
Striated Pardalote
Eastern Spinebill
Yellow-faced Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
White-eared Honeyeater
Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
Purple-gaped Honeyeater
Fuscous Honeyeater
White-plumed Honeyeater
White-fronted Honeyeater
Noisy Miner
Yellow-throated Miner
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
Little Wattlebird
Red Wattlebird
Crimson Chat
White-fronted Chat
Tawny-crowned Honeyeater
Crescent Honeyeater
Black-chinned honeyeater
Brown-headed Honeyeater
White-naped honeyeater
Blue-faced Honeyeater
Noisy friarbird
Little Friarbird
Striped Honeyeater
Painted Honeyeater

Gallery Page 3
(this web page)

Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Spotted Quail-thrush
Varied Sittella
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-winged Triller
Crested Shrike-tit
Gilbert's whistler
Golden Whistler
Rufous Whistler
Grey Shrike-thrush
Crested Bellbird
Olive-backed Oriole
White-
breasted Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow
White-
browed Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow
Grey Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird
Australian Magpie
Pied Currawong
Grey Currawong
Grey Fantail
Willie Wagtail
Australian Raven
Little Raven
Leaden Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher
White-winged Chough
Jacky Winter
Scarlet Robin
Red-capped Robin
Flame Robin
Rose Robin
Hooded Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Southern Scrub-robin
Horsfield's Bushlark
Eurasian Skylark
Golden-headed Cisticola
Australian Reed-Warbler
Little Grassbird
Rufous Songlark
Brown Songlark
Silvereye
White-backed Swallow
Welcome Swallow
Fairy Martin
Tree Martin
Common Blackbird
Common Starling
Common Myna
Mistletoebird
Zebra Finch
Red-browed Finch
Diamond Firetail
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Australasian Pipit
European Goldfinch


 

 

 

 

 

 

Links to web sites featuring photo galleries of Australian birds

ABC Science Lab: Backyard Birds

Abberton Bird Galleries
Bill Jolly's site

Australian Bird Photography
Peter Fuller's birding site

Australian Birdlife Photo Library
photos by Greg Holland and Leon Keasey; commercial site

Australian Museum's photos of Australian birds

Aviceda Australian Bird Image Database
by Tom Tarrant; includes bird video clips

BirdQuest: Australian Photo Gallery
Kevin Vang's site

Birdway: photos of Australian birds
photos by Ian Montgomery; commercial site

Cheryl Ridge's Photo Gallery
(bird section)

Chris Ross Bird Gallery: Aus-Natural

David Kleinert Photography
photos, many of which were taken in the Murray Valley, by David Kleinert

Flickr
Australian Bird Section

Gondwana Guides' bird photo gallery
(photographs, mainly of SE Qld birds by Barry Davies and Dan Blunt)

Graham Chapman Photographics

Jon Hosford's 'Winderdoon Bird Galley'
Jon Hosford was co-founder of this Branch

PhotoBOCA
BOCA's photographic group

Photo Gallery of Australian Birds
Paul Hackett's site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of birds which have often been observed in northern Victoria and/or southern Riverina in the order by which they appear on page 1 of this gallery.
Introduced birds are not pictured on this page.
Emu

Stubble Quail
1Brown Quail
Magpie Goose
Plumed Whistling Duck
Musk Duck
Black Swan
Australian Shelduck
Australian Wood Duck
Pink-eared Duck
Australasian Shoveler
Grey Teal
Chestnut Teal
Mallard (introduced)
Pacific Black Duck
Hardhead
Blue-billed Duck
Australasian Grebe

Hoary-headed Grebe
Great-crested Grebe
Rock Dove (introduced)
Spotted Dove (Introduced)
Common Bronzewing
Crested Pigeon
Diamond Dove
Peaceful Dove
Tawny Frogmouth
Spotted Nightjar
Australian Owlet Nightjar
White-throated Needletail
Fork-tailed Swift
Australasian Darter
Little Pied Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Little Black Cormorant
Pied Cormorant
Australian Pelican
Australasian Bittern
Australian Little Bittern
White-necked Heron
Eastern Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Cattle Egret
White-faced Heron
Little Egret
Nankeen Night Heron
Glossy Ibis
Australian White Ibis
Straw-necked Ibis
Royal Spoonbill
Yellow-billed Spoonbill
Black-shouldered Kite
Square-tailed Kite
White-bellied Sea-eagle
Whistling Kite
Black Kite
Brown Goshawk
Collared Sparrowhawk
Spotted Harrier
Swamp Harrier
Wedge-tailed Eagle
Little Eagle
Nankeen Kestrel
Brown Falcon
Australian Hobby
Black Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
Brolga
Purple Swamphen
Lewin's Rail
Buff-banded Rail
Baillons Crake
Australian Spotted Crake
Spotless Crake
Black-tailed Native Hen
Dusky Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Australian Bustard
Bush Stone Curlew
Black-winged Stilt
Red-necked Avocet
Banded Stilt
Red-capped Plover
Double-banded Plover
Inland Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel
Red-kneed Dotterel
Banded Lapwing
Masked Lapwing
Plains-wanderer
Australian Painted Snipe
Latham's Snipe
Common Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Red-necked Stint
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Painted Button-quail
Red-chested Button-quail
Australian Pratincole
Caspian Tern
Whiskered Tern
Silver Gull

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Bird Photo Gallery 3


Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike by David Ong

Photo gallery of Echuca district birds

This is the third (and last) page of photographs of bird species that have been observed in northern Victoria, central Victoria (Bendigo area) and/or southern (Riverina) New South Wales.

 

~ Photographs of David Ong ~

Additional photography by Murray Chambers, Marlene Lyell, Donna Pollard, Duncan Turnbull,
Albert Wright and Keith Stockwell



Grey-crowned Babbler
Grey-crowned Babbler
The Grey-crowned Babbler no longer survives in much of its previous range. Grey-crowned Babblers are often sighted in the Womboota area and along Gunbower Creek. One of their noisy calls sounds like yahoo! yahoo!
Photographer: David Ong




White-browed Babblers
White-browed Babbler

Also known as Happy Families,
White-browed Babblers lives in family groups in scrubby woodland areas.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Chestnut-crowned Babbler
Chestnut-crowned Babbler

The least common of the three Babbler species found in our region, the Chestnut-crowned is reported to have been sighted in Terrick Terrick National Park
Photographer: David Ong

 


Spotted Quail-thrush

This ground-dwelling bird is becoming increasingly rare and is limited to the east of the region. There are no recent sightings close to Echuca-Moama.

 


Varied Sittella
Varied Sittella

Whilst Tree-creepers climb up tree trunks, the Varied Sittella comes down them. A family is often observed nesting in the Moama (Five Mile) precinct of Murray Regional Park.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

Individual birds are frequently seen throughout the region.
There is another photograph immediately below.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike by David Ong
Ground Cuckoo-shr.Ground Cuckoo-shrike by Murray Chambers
This species is uncommon in our district. This was one of five Ground Cuckoo-shrikes observed alongside the Murray Valley Highway near Wyuna on 16th June 2013 (shortly after several days of showers).

White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike
White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike

Uncommon in our region.
Photographer: David Ong

White-winged Triller
White-winged Triller

Uncommon. The male(pictured above) is black and white whilst the female is brown.

 


Crested ST
Crested Shrike-tit

Uncommon in our region. Sometimes observed alongside Gulpa Creek near Mathoura.
Photographer: David Ong


Gilbert's Whistler
Gilbert's Whistler

This is the least common of three Whistlers often observed in the region. Reliable places to observe this species include the base of Mt Terrick Terrick and the walking track that leads south-west from Campbells Road dams.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Golden swhistler
Golden Whistler

Female and juvenile Golden Whistlers lack the
golden breast colour of the male (male above).
Photographer: David Ong

 


Rufous Whistler
Rufous Whistler

A common forest bird, especially in River Red Gum forests.
Only mature males have a distinct rufous-coloured chest.
Photographer: David Ong

 


GST
Grey Shrike-thrush

Common throughout the region. Its calls are a feature of local bushland.
Photographer: David Ong

Crested Bellbird
Crested Bellbird

An inland bird, Crested Bellbird is often seen or heard in
Box-Ironbark forests and in Goschen Bushland Reserve.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Olive-backed Oriole
Olive-backed Oriole

Individual birds are often heard in local bushland.
Its call sounds like or-iole.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 



White-breasted Woodswallow

Large migratory flocks are sometimes observed in our region.
Absent from our region over winter.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Masked Woodswallow
Masked Woodswallow

Sometimes Masked Woodswallows are seen amongst migratory flocks of other woodswallows.
It is usually absent from our region over winter.
Photographer: Murray Chamnbers



White-browed Woodswallow

Sometimes migratory flocks of woodswallows can be observed, e.g. in Terrick Terrick National Park and at Goschen Reserve. Absent over winter.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Black-faced Woodswallow
Black-faced Woodswallow

Present in small numbers all year.
Photographer: Roger Standen

 


Dusky Woodswallow
Dusky Woodswallow

Reasonably common.
Dusky Woodswallows are present in our region all year.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Pied Butcherbird
Pied Butcherbird (Mature) by Murray Chambers

Grey Butcherbird
Grey Butcherbird

This bird is often observed in Box-Ironbark forests
and along water courses.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

Pied Butchewrbird
Pied Butcherbird
Immature

Reasonably common, especially to the north of our region. Its distinctive three-note flute-like whistle reveals its presence.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Magpie
Australian Magpie

A very common bird in urban areas, on farmland
and in forests throughout our region.
To the north of the region, most Magpies have black-backs.
Males may swoop on people who venture close to their nest.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 


Pied currawong
Pied Currawong

A winter visitor to our our region. Their harsh calls signal their arrival from the mountains.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Grey Currawong
Grey Currawong

This species is most common in the south of the region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Grey Fantail
Grey Fantail

Fairly common
This species is often observed throughout the region.
Photographer: Murray Chambers.



Willy Wagtail
Willie Wagtail

Very common throughout the region
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 


Australian Raven
Australian Raven

Very common. Usually solitary or in small groups, often in woodland.
Australian Ravens often have a falling aashhh at the end of a period of calling. Note the hackles on the thraot.
There are no crow species is found in our region.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 


Little Raven
Little Raven

Very common.
Flocks of Little Ravens are often observed on farmland. Little ravens are sometimes observed in urban areas.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull

 


image
Leaden Flycatcher

Not common.
This bird is sometimes observed to the south-east of the region.
Images of this species can be purchased from www.gypsytwitchers.com
Photographer: Albert Wright

 


Restless Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher

The Restless Flycatcher sometimes seems to hover in the air.
Similar in appearance to Willie Wagtail.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


Magpie Lark
Magpie Lark

Magpie Larks are common near wetlands and rivers and may visit urban parkland.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Restless Flycatcher
Restless Flycatcher by Murray Chambers

White-winged Chough
White-winged Chough

Throughout our region, groups of a dozen or so White-winged Choughs are often observed in woodland and along country roads. They add an erie wailing cry to the bush.
Photographer: Duncan Turnbull



Jacky Wnter
Jacky Winter

This species seems to prefer woodland areas. Park.
Photographer: David Ong

 

Rose Robin
Rose Robin by Murray Chambers
The Rose Robin lives in moist gullies to the south and east of the region. It is absent from the north and west of the region.


Red-capped Robin
Red-capped Robin

Red-capped Robins seem to like grassy clearings and shrubs with low branches in forested areas.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

Red-capped_young
Red-capped Robin
Young Male
This young male has yet to develop the striking colours
of a mature male.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell

 



Flame Robin
Flame Robin

Flame Robins are winter visitors to our region. The species can be distinguished from other robins by the fact that the red breast extends up to the beak.
Photographer: David Ong

 



Flame Robin_juvenile
Flame Robin
Young male
This young Flame Robin
has yet to develop the striking colours
of an adult male.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell

 


Scarlet Robin
Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robins are found in the south of the region
Photographer: David Ong




Hooded Robin

Hooded Robins are often observed in forest reserves,
including Terrick Terrick National Park. The male bird is to the left and the female to the right.
Photographer: David Ong

ditto
Hooded Robin
Male
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Eastern yellow Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robins seem to prefer undisturbed bushland areas.
Photographer: Murray Chambers



Southern Scrub RobinSouthern Scrub Robin

Uncommon. Sometimes observed atop small shrubs singing. However, it spends much of its time foraging on the ground. Often sighted at Mt Egbert/The Granites.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 


Bushlark
Horsfield's Bushlark

This grassland species is found at such places as the native grasslands of Terrick Terrick National Park. Previously called Singing Bushlark.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Eurasian Skylark

Introduced
Most likely to be observed in grassland areas.



Golden-headed Cisticola
Golden-headed Cisticola

Sometimes observed in reeds or grasses at the edge of sewage ponds and wetlands.



Reed Warbler
Australian Reed-Warbler

A summer migrant, Reed Warblers are often heard rather than seen in the reeds and rushes of wetland areas. A few individuals may stay over winter.
Photographer: Keith Stockwell

 


LGrassbir Little Grassbird

This species prefers to live in the dense reeds and rushes of swampy areas. It is a summer migrant to our region.
A higher resolution copy can be purchased from www.gypsytwitchers.com
Photographer: Albert Wright



Rufous Songlark
Rufous Songlark

Rufous Songlarks are most likely to be observed in
grassland areas with living or dead trees. The male is larger than the female.
Photographer: David Ong.

 


Brown Songlark k
Brown Songlark

This species is often observed in grassland areas. The male often displays on fence posts, its calls starting with a loud trill which develops into a loud ringing refrain.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Silvereye
Silvereye

Silvereyes are often observed in urban areas, pecking at fruit. They are migrants, different sub-species being present at different times of the year.
Photographer: Marlene Lyell



White-backed Swallows
White-backed Swallow

White-backed Swallows are black and white swallows of drier habitats. They are usually in small flocks and may forage with Tree Martins. In cold weather, up to about 20 may roost in a burrow. The pair shown above were sighted just north of Bendigo.
Photographer: Murray Chambers


Welcome Swallow
Welcome Swallow

Welcome Swallows are a common sight, circling over wetlands and rivers.
Photographer: Donna Pollard

 



Fairy Martin

Also known as Bottle Swallow because of the shape of the nests it builds under bridges and culverts, the Fairy Martin is a small white-naped swallow similar to a Tree Martin but with a ginger crown.


Tree Martin
Tree Martin

A reliable spot of observing Tree Martins is the picnic ground at Terrick Terrick National Park.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Common Indian Myna
Common (Indian) Myna

Introduced pest. When present in an area, their numbers may quickly increase; aggressive to other birds.
Do not confuse with the native Noisy Miner.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 

 


Starling
Common Starling

Introduced
Sometimes large flocks of starlings can be seen on farmland.
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 



Blackbird
Common Blackbird

Introduced. Very common in urban areas. The Blackbird is an annoying garden bird because it scratches away, spreading mulch over paths and lawns.
Photographer: Donna Pollard.



 




 


Mistletoebird
Mistletoebird
This species eats and spreads the sticky berries of Mistletoe.
Photographer: David Ong

 


Zebra Finch
Zebra Finch
Zebra Finches are often observed where there are bushes near a stream.
Photographer: David Ong

 



Red-bfowed Fnch
Red-browed Finch

Red-browed Finches are often observed alongside streams, e.g. in Moama Wetlands.
Photographer: David Ong




Diamond Firetail
Diamond Firetail

Diamond Firetail numbers crashed during the recent prolonged drought but numbers recovered a little following the subsequent period of heavy rain. Often observed in Terrick Terrick National Park, Benarca Forest and alongside Cockatoo Lagoon.
Photographer: David Ong



House Sparrow
House Sparrow

Introduced
By far the most common of the two sparrow species found in our region. House Sparrows may nest in trees in urban areas and are often seen near supermarkets and takeaway food outlets.
Photographer: Donna Pollard

Tree Sparrow

Introduced.
Increasingly uncommon. Nests in buildings, especially old buildings.
Tree
Sparrows are reasonably common in the area around Echuca Hospital.



Australasian Pipit
Australasian Pipit

Formerly called Richard's Pipit this bird resembles a skinny sparrow and is often seen sitting on fence posts in grassland areas
Photographer: Murray Chambers

 


European Goldfinch
Introduced. Sometimes observed in shrubbery on farms.
Australasian PipitAustralasian Pipit by Murray Chambers


The above photos are by David Ong except where otherwise stated.

 

Bird Photo Gallery 3

 

Click the next button for a list of coming outings and events.
Sixteenth year on the web.

To contact webmeister email echuca @ birdlife. org. au
Mail address: Secretary, BirdLife Echuca District, 11 Hillview Ave MOAMA 2731
This site was established during 1996.
Latest revision of this page: October 2012.